Understanding Pelvic Organ Prolapse

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Pelvic organ prolapse happens when the muscles and tissues supporting your pelvic organs (the uterus, bladder, or rectum) become weak or loose. This allows one or more of these organs to drop or press into or out of your vagina. You may be embarrassed to talk about it with your doctor, but don’t be. You won’t be the first! POP is fairly common. And it’s treatable.

What Are the Symptoms?

The most common symptom of POP is the pressure you feel during physical activity. Urogynecologist Dr. William Rush explains: 

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Who Gets POP? Who Doesn’t?

Genetics plays a role in your risk of getting POP. But there are other reasons why you may get POP. Dr. Rush explains:

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Is There Anything I Can Do To Prevent POP?

Can you prevent POP or keep it from getting worse? It’s a common question, says Dr. Rush.  Here’s what you can do:

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If you have (or think you have) POP, don’t be concerned that it’s a sign of something else happening. “Pelvic organ prolapse is rarely an indication of something else,” says Dr. Rush. If you have it, you likely will have urinary leakage or may be unable to empty your bladder, he says. But there’s no reason to be concerned that POP is a sign of other problems. 

Learn about treatment options for POP.

It's easy to get the care you need.

See a Premier Physician Network provider near you.