How To Remain Safe During a Thunderstorm

Health Topics
Safe-in-Storm_760x427_SclMd

It's easy to get the care you need.

See a Premier Physician Network provider near you.

Every year more than 400 people are struck by lightning in the U.S. and about 70 are killed. Here’s how you can stay safe during a storm, according to Premier Health athletic trainer Ashley Moman, ATC:

  • Indoors is safest. If outdoors when the storm hits, get to an enclosed structure with walls and a roof, like the nearest building or car with the doors and windows closed. Partially enclosed structures like bus stops or porches are not safe.
  • Avoid bodies of water, corded phones, electrical equipment, fences, metal bleachers, plumbing, trees, utility poles.

Lightning isn’t always visible (it can be present when the sun’s out). Seek shelter when you first hear thunder.

Playing an outdoor sport should be halted as soon as thunder is heard, or if your weather alert radio signals an incoming storm. Don’t resume play until 30 minutes after hearing the last clap of thunder or the last sight of lightning.

If someone is struck by lightning:

  • Call 911 immediately
  • If lightning is still in the area, move the victim to a safe area.
  • Check the victim’s heartbeat and breathing. (Victims of lightning strikes don’t carry an electrical charge. They are safe to touch.)
  • Administer CPR if needed.
  • Lightning can cause other injuries like burns. Treat them with basic first aid until help arrives.

It's easy to get the care you need.

See a Premier Physician Network provider near you.

Ashley Moman, ATC

Ashley Moman, ATC