We’re in This Together: Your Partner's Role in Breastfeeding

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As a mom, you play the leading role in breastfeeding. But it’s important for your partner to feel that they're a key part of the process, too. Learn how to involve your partner for the health of your baby — and your relationship.

Before your baby is born, get your partner on board with breastfeeding.

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  • If they seem nervous or jealous, get them to open up. Some partners worry that they’ll feel left out, or that they can’t do as much for their baby as you can. Ask them for their input about choosing to breastfeed.
  • Tell them that you need their support more than ever. After the baby is born, you’ll need someone who shows they're there for you in many ways — by bringing you water, cleaning the house, bathing the baby and more.
  • Ask them to attend a birthing, breastfeeding or new parenting class with you. Most hospitals offer these classes.
  • Share breastfeeding basics with them. Explain that breast is best, especially during the first six months of your baby’s life. Their support can help you extend that time if you want to continue to nurse longer.
  • Enlist the help of one of their friends whose partner breastfed, or is still breastfeeding. Talking to a friend can help dispel any fears.

After your baby’s birth, it’s time for your partner to ramp up their nurturing skills. Encourage them to:

  • Bring the baby to you for nursing.
  • Change the baby’s diapers.
  • Prepare meals and snacks for you — after all, you need to be well nourished to make milk for your baby.
  • Bring you what you need while you’re breastfeeding — a glass of water, fresh nursing pads, tissues or lanolin cream to soothe your breasts.
  • Feed the baby a bottle of your expressed milk after your baby is used to nursing, usually a few weeks after birth.
Some partners worry that they’ll feel left out, or that they can’t do as much for their baby as you can.

Breastfeeding and Your Sex Life

Just because you’re breastfeeding doesn’t mean putting your personal life on hold. There’s no need to restrict your sex life, but you may need to make a few changes so sex is more comfortable for both of you:

  • Vaginal dryness: Like many women, you may notice vaginal dryness right after you give birth and during breastfeeding. That’s because of lower-than-normal estrogen levels. Indulge in more foreplay and try water-based lubricants.
  • Leaking breasts: If you leak or even spray milk during sex, don’t be surprised. Try putting pressure on your nipples or keep a towel handy to catch any milk.

It's easy to get the care you need.

See a Premier Physician Network provider near you.