Neuropsychologists and Brain Health

Fadi Tayim, PhD, Division Chief of Neuropsychology at the Clinical Neuroscience Institute, answers frequently asked questions about the many ways neuropsychologists can assess brain function and health.

Is it a myth that hormones play a part in forgetfulness?

Dr. Fadi Tayim discusses the of hormones in memory loss. Click play to watch the video or read the transcript.

Is it a myth that hormones play a part in forgetfulness?

Hormone regulation is very important in terms of not just memory, but overall brain functions. Our brain, just like any other organ system, operates on the presumption that hormones are imbalanced.

One of the things that is most detrimental to women who are perimenopausal, who then become menopausal, is this memory decline that generally happens within 12 months, switching from perimenopausal to the postmenopausal period. It's very common to have that kind of memory decline that then generally levels out. That's not typically any type of impairment. It just happens that your brain is readjusting to the level of available hormone in the body. Once it regulates, all memory functions or attention functions seem to regulate as well.

 

Hormone regulation is very important in terms of memory and overall brain functions. Our brain, just like any other organ system, operates on the presumption that hormones are imbalanced.

Memory does decline in some perimenopausal women who then become menopausal. This generally happens within 12 months, switching from perimenopausal to the postmenopausal period. It's very common to see some memory decline, but it generally levels out. There is typically no type of impairment. What happens is that your brain is readjusting to the level of available hormones. Once it regulates, all memory functions or attention functions seem to regulate as well.

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Source: Fadi Tayim, PhD, Clinical Neuroscience Institute; American Psychological Association; American Academy of Clinical Neuropsychology