Athletes and Overuse Injuries

Premier Health providers answer frequently asked questions about sports related overuse injuries.

If an athlete’s injury does not improve after a decrease in activity and initial treatment, what are the next steps?

Athletic trainer Justin Perkins discusses additional treatment options for overuse injuries. Click play to watch the video or read the transcript.

If an athlete’s injury does not improve after a decrease in activity and initial treatment, what are the next steps?

After about five to seven days, if the athlete tends to not get better in our care, we will refer them off to a sports medicine physician, for further evaluation. The sports medicine physician will then decide if maybe the athlete needs some sort of imaging, whether that's an MRI or an X-ray of the injured area. They can also do a lot of in-house treatment, including maybe a cortisone shot or an anti-inflammatory shot to the area, to help with pain. To help decrease pain. Then also, they can maybe refer them off to further rehab that they may need. The rehab will expand on the things we do here at the training room, to more stretching, more strengthening type exercises. Then they can also incorporate other tools that we have in the rehab facility, including the AlterG if it's a lower extremity type injury. The AlterG is an antigravity treadmill that we have, that tends to suspend the athlete about the treadmill, and allows for a decrease in bodyweight on that injured area, the knee, the ankle, et cetera. Then that way, they can continue running without the pounding of their body weight on that area.

 

After about five to seven days, if the athlete does not get better in our care, we will refer them to a sports medicine physician for further evaluation. The sports medicine physician can decide if the athlete needs some imaging, such as an MRI or an X-ray of the injured area.

They can also do a lot of in-house treatment, including an anti-inflammatory shot to the area, to help decrease pain.

The doctor may also refer the patient for further rehabilitation. Rehab can expand on the things we do here in the training room, such as more stretching, more strengthening type exercises. They can also incorporate other tools, including the AlterG, which is most often used for a lower extremity injury.

Source: Jeffrey James, DO, Jon Sulentic, DO, Premier Orthopedics; Justin Perkins, Premier Health athletic trainer; American Medical Society for Sports Medicine; National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases