Athletes and Overuse Injuries

Premier Health providers answer frequently asked questions about sports related overuse injuries.

Are there long-term consequences from overuse injuries?

Dr. Jeffrey James discusses the long-term effects of overuse injuries. Click play to watch the video or read the transcript.

Are there long-term consequences from overuse injuries?

Most of the time, overuse injuries don't pose any long-term consequences as long as they're diagnosed appropriately and caught early. The treatment generally with rest and adequate training programs can prevent the long-term consequences, but if you continue to do your activities and just push through the pain, you can certainly have some long-term consequences. A few examples of this would be youth baseball or softball players who continue to pitch or play with elbow pain and they can develop fractures to the growth plates in their arm or even tears to the ligaments in the elbow that may require surgery and have long-term consequences. A second example would be runners who just continue to run through the pain and they can develop stress injuries to the bone that eventually can lead to true fractures that can sometimes be pretty bad or require surgeries.

   

Most of the time, overuse injuries don't pose any long-term issues as long as they're diagnosed appropriately and caught early. Getting enough rest and using adequate training programs can prevent long-term consequences. If you continue activities and just push through the pain, you can certainly cause some long-term problems. A few examples of this would be youth baseball or softball players who continue to pitch or play with elbow pain. They can develop fractures to the growth plates in their arm or even tears to the ligaments in the elbow that may require surgery. A second example would be runners who continue to run through the pain. They can develop stress injuries to the bone that eventually can lead to true fractures that can be serious or require surgeries.

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Source: Jeffrey James, DO, Jon Sulentic, DO, Premier Orthopedics; Justin Perkins, Premier Health athletic trainer; American Medical Society for Sports Medicine; National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases