Answers to Common Ear, Nose, and Throat Questions

Premier Health providers answer frequently asked questions about ear, nose, and throat health.

Who is at risk for developing smell and taste disorders?

Dr. Adam discusses who is at risk for developing smell and taste disorders. Click play to watch the video or read the transcript.

 

It has been shown that people start to lose their sense of smell after age 60, according to the American Academy of OtolaryngologyOff Site Icon (AAO).

People who have chronic sinus diseases, especially those with polyps, are at risk of having smell and taste disorders, according to Premier Health Specialists’ (PHS) physicians. The polyps grow along the lining of the nose and block smells from getting to the part of the nose where smell is perceived.

Also, people chronically suffering with allergic rhinitis from allergies and hay fever can be at increased risk of smell and taste disorders, according to PHS physicians.

Hormonal disturbances and dental problems also can increase someone’s risk of smell and taste disorders, according to the AAO. Being exposed to some kinds of chemicals, insecticides, and medicines can cause this kind of polyps.

People who have smoked and radiation therapy patients both are at higher risk of losing their senses of smell and taste, according to the AAO. Some nervous system diseases also can cause smell and taste disorders.

To learn more about who is at increased risk for smell and taste disorders, talk with your doctor.

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Source: Stewart Adam, MD, Premier ENT Associates; Jeffrey Adam, MD, Premier ENT Associates; Laura Tully, MD, Premier ENT Associates

Jeffery S. Adam, MD, FACS

Jeffery S. Adam, MD, FACS

Premier ENT Associates

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