Fragility Factors: Risks and Prevention

Premier Health providers answer frequently asked questions about fragility fractures along with the risks and prevention factors for women as they age.

What types of surgery are done after a fracture?

Dr. Jennifer Jerele talks about surgical treatment procedures for fracture patients. Click play to watch the video or read the transcript.

What types of surgery are done after a fracture?

Once a hip fracture occurs, the most common surgical procedures we perform is either a partial or a full hip replacement or what we call an intramedullary nail, which is a metal rod that goes down the middle of the femur bone with some screws up across that stabilize that hip. The advantage of doing those types of procedures is that patients can generally get up and start walking on them right away. It gets them out of bed and decreases risks of things like blood clots, and pneumonia, and patients can really return to function a little bit faster. The other most common type of fragility fracture is a distal radius fracture, or a wrist fracture, and a lot of those don't necessarily require surgery but it can be the kind of event that says we need to look into this bone density issue.

   

Once a hip fracture occurs, the most common surgical procedures we perform are either a partial or a full hip replacement, or a procedure called an intramedullary nail, which is a metal rod that goes down the middle of the femur bone with some screws up across that stabilize that hip. The advantage of these procedures is that patients can generally get up and start walking right away. It gets them out of bed and decreases the risk of things like blood clots and pneumonia, and patients can really return to function a little bit faster. Wrist fracture is the other common fragility fracture. They don't necessarily require surgery, but they can be the event that indicates a patient may have a bone density issue.

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Source: Jennifer Jerele, MD, Premier Orthopedics