Answers to Common Hip Arthritis Questions

Dr. Ryan Bauman answers frequently asked questions about hip arthritis.

Is it hip pain or back pain?

Dr. Ryan Bauman explains hip and back pain. Click play to watch the video or read the transcript.

 

Sometimes pain from other areas of the body, such as the back can radiate to the hip and cause hip pain. According to the Arthritis FoundationOff Site Icon. Some pain can originate with the sciatic nerve, which runs around the buttocks and can be often confused for hip pain, according to the AF.

Osteoarthritis in the hip usually causes pain that can be felt in the groin and also in the buttocks, according to the AF. Your doctor may finally be able to determine whether it’s hip or back pain through a diagnostic procedure such as an X-ray, according to the AF.

For more information about hip and back pain, talk to your doctor.

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Who is at risk for osteoarthritis?

Dr. Ryan Bauman explains who may be at risk for osteoarthritis. Click play to watch the video or read the transcript.

 

Some factors involved in osteoarthritis are gender, physical trauma, age and genetics, according to the American Association of Family PhysiciansOff Site Icon.

Wear and tear of the joints is another factor, according to the American Academy of Physical Medicine and RehabilitationOff Site Icon. Over time and with more use, joints can degenerate, leading to osteoarthritis, according to the AAPMR. Obesity may contribute to the degeneration, so it’s important to maintain a healthy weight to avoid osteoarthritis in the hip, according to the AAPMR.

Ask your doctor about the risk factors involved with osteoarthritis.

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How is arthritis of the hip diagnosed?

Dr. Ryan Bauman explains how arthritis of the hip is diagnosed. Click play to watch the video or read the transcript.

 

Early diagnosis of hip arthritis is important, so treatment may begin before any further damage to the joints occur, according to the American Academy of Orthopaedic SurgeonsOff Site Icon. Diagnostics may include physical examinations, X-rays, or blood tests, according to the AAOS.

Imaging tests such as X-rays or MRIs allow a physician to see inside the hip and make a more definitive diagnosis, according to the Arthritis FoundationOff Site Icon.

For more information about diagnosing hip arthritis, talk to your doctor.

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What are some treatment options for arthritis of the hip?

Dr. Ryan Bauman explains treatment options for hip arthritis. Click play to watch the video or read the transcript.

 

Like many forms of osteoarthritis, the first options in treating hip arthritis are non-surgical, according to the American Academy of Orthopaedic SurgeonsOff Site Icon. Surgical methods are only considered after every non-surgical option has been tried and proven unsuccessful, according to the AAOS.

Non-surgical options include the use of the over-the-counter pain relief medications such as acetaminophen, according to the Arthritis FoundationOff Site Icon. Other non-surgical options are nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs or joint injections, according to the AF.

sk your doctor about treatment options for arthritis.

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How effective are joint injections for hip arthritis?

Dr. Ryan Bauman discusses the effectiveness of joint injections for hip arthritis. Click play to watch the video or read the transcript.

 

Recent studies suggest that the use of some types of joint injections bring some temporary pain relief for hips arthritis sufferers, according to the National Institutes of HealthOff Site Icon.

Physicians often use joint injections for diagnosis as well as treatment, according to the American College of RheumatologyOff Site Icon. An injection in the hip to relieve arthritis pain, if successful in treating the discomfort, may let your doctor know that the joint pain is the source of the condition, according to the ACR.

For more information about joint injections for hip arthritis, talk to your doctor.

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What is the surgical treatment option for my joint pain?

Dr. Ryan Bauman discusses surgical treatment options for joint pain. Click play to watch the video or read the transcript.

 

For some with hip arthritis, surgery to treat the condition may be necessary after drug treatment and other non- or minimally-invasive methods have failed, according to the National Institutes of HealthOff Site Icon.

One surgical option is total hip replacement in which the entire joint is replaced, according American Academy of Orthopaedic SurgeonsOff Site Icon. The patient’s individual condition, severity, and type of arthritis are things your doctor may take into account when considering surgical options, according to the AAOS.

Ask your doctor about surgical options for treating joint pain.

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What is hip replacement surgery?

Dr. Ryan Bauman explains what hip replacement surgery involves. Click play to watch the video or read the transcript.

 

Total hip replacement is a method of treating various types of arthritis of the hip, according to the American Academy of Orthopaedic SurgeonsOff Site Icon. In this procedure, the damaged joint is removed and replaced with prosthetic parts, according to the AAOS.

The hip operates like a ball and socket, according to the National Institutes of HealthOff Site Icon. The thigh bone has a femoral head (the ball) that fits into the pelvic acetabulum (the socket), according to the NIH. A typical traditional hip replacement procedure takes one to two hours as the surgeon replaces the head of the femur and the acetabulum with new, artificial parts, according to the NIH.

For more information about hip replacement surgery, talk to your doctor.

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What is the newest innovation in hip replacement?

Dr. Ryan Bauman talks about the newest innovations in hip replacement. Click play to watch the video or read the transcript.

 

Total hip replacements can now be performed with less invasive methods, according to the American Academy of Orthopaedic SurgeonsOff Site Icon. A traditional (posterior) hip replacement may require an incision from 10 to 12 inches long, while minimally-invasive methods are done with one- to three-inch incisions, according to the AAOS.

Researchers are also looking at developing stress-resistant materials and alternative prosthetic designs, as well as ways to decreasing the body’s inflammatory response to artificial joints, according to the National Institutes of HealthOff Site Icon.

For more information about innovations in hip replacement, talk to your doctor.

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What are the benefits of anterior hip replacement?

Dr. Ryan Bauman explains the benefits of anterior hip replacement. Click play to watch the video or read the transcript.

 

Anterior hip replacement, a procedure in which the incision is made in the front of the patient rather than through the side or back, is increasingly more common for a number of reasons having to do with its benefits, according to the National Institutes of HealthOff Site Icon. According to the NIH, patients who have anterior hip replacement as opposed to other surgical hip replacement methods may experience:

  • Less blood loss
  • Decreased dislocation rate
  • Faster recovery
  • Retention of normal muscle strength

For more information about the benefits of anterior hip replacement, talk to your doctor.

Who are good candidates for anterior hip replacement?

Dr. Ryan Bauman explains who may be good candidates for anterior hip replacement. Click play to watch the video or read the transcript.

 

Almost all patients are eligible for anterior hip replacement than they are for other minimally-invasive methods, according to Ryan Bauman, MD, Premier Health. The anterior, or front, of the body is thinner than the back, so patients of any size can be considered for the procedure, said Bauman.

The procedure has gained popularity recently due to benefits such as faster recovery, less loss of muscle strength and decreased dislocation rate, according to National Institutes of HealthOff Site Icon.

For more information about anterior hip replacement, talk to your doctor.

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What are the advantages of hip replacement surgery?

Dr. Ryan Bauman explains the advantages of hip replacement surgery. Click play to watch the video or read the transcript.

 

Patients may choose hip replacement surgery to relieve their pain, improve their mobility, and get them back to normal activities, according to the National Institutes of HealthOff Site Icon.

Because osteoarthritis is the most common cause of chronic hip pain, the best advantage of replacement surgery is that it eliminates that discomfort, according to the American Academy of Orthopaedic SurgeonsOff Site Icon Total hip replacement involves the removal and replacement of the damaged bone and cartilage that causes the pain of hip arthritis, according to the AAOS.

Talk to your doctor about the advantages of hip replacement surgery.

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What activities should I expect to resume after hip replacement?

Dr. Ryan Bauman discusses the activities one may resume after hip replacement surgery. Click play to watch the video or read the transcript.

 

It’s important to exercise after hip replacement surgery to reduce pain and stiffness and build muscle strength, according to the American Academy of Orthopaedic SurgeonsOff Site Icon. Patients should begin with light exercise before working their way up to day-to-day activities, according to the AAOS.

Your doctor will decide when you should begin more strenuous activity, according to the National Institutes of HealthOff Site Icon. According to the NIH, some strengthening activities your doctor may eventually recommend include:

  • Bicycling
  • Cross-country skiing
  • Swimming
  • Walking

For more information about activity following hip replacement surgery, talk to your doctor.

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How long does a joint replacement typically last?

Dr. Ryan Bauman talks about how long a joint replacement usually lasts. Click play to watch the video or read the transcript.

 

Prosthetics used in joint replacements may last many years, according to the American Association of Family PhysiciansOff Site Icon. Patients who have had joint replacement report full functioning from 15 to 20 years after surgery, according to the AAFP.

Most patients have mild to no pain, and improved function at two-and five-year marks post-surgery. For more information about the longevity of joint replacement, talk to your doctor.

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What is hip revision surgery?

Dr. Ryan Bauman explains what hip revision surgery is. Click play to watch the video or read the transcript.

 

If a hip prosthetic becomes worn or damaged, revision surgery may be required, according to the American Academy of Orthopaedic SurgeonsOff Site Icon. Revision surgery is the procedure in which damaged or worn hip prosthetics are removed and replaced, according to the AAOS.

Hip revisions are becoming more common because more people are having hip replacements younger, and those prosthetics are replaced after about 20 years, according to the National Institutes of HealthOff Site Icon. It is typically a more difficult and complicated surgery requiring more recovery time than the initial hip replacement procedure, according to the NIH.

For more information about hip revision surgery, talk to your doctor.

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What is the difference between bursitis and arthritis?

Dr. Ryan Bauman talks about the difference between bursitis and arthritis. Click play to watch the video or read the transcript.

 

Hip arthritis is a condition affecting the hip joint, according to the Arthritis FoundationOff Site Icon. Some forms of arthritis cause cartilage to thin, pushing bones together; others occur when joint membranes become inflamed and erode bones, according to the AF.

Bursitis affects a fluid sac outside the hip, according to the American Academy of Orthopaedic SurgeonsOff Site Icon. Unlike the pain of arthritis that can be constant, bursitis pain is most acute when the patient is lying or sitting on the affected area, according to the AAOS.

Ask your doctor about the differences between bursitis and arthritis.

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What is a hip impingement?

Dr. Ryan Bauman explains what a hip impingement is. Click play to watch the video or read the transcript.

 

Hip impingement is when the ball-and-socket structure of the hip doesn’t fit together due to abnormal shape, according to the American Academy of Orthopaedic SurgeonsOff Site Icon. The imperfect fit may cause bones to rub together, possibly leading to osteoarthritis, according to the AAOS.

Hip impingement diagnoses appear more common as more people are increasingly active, according to the American Association of Family PhysiciansOff Site Icon. Patients recognize the pain when leaning forward or pivoting during strenuous activity or sports, according to the AAFP.

For more information about hip impingement, talk to your doctor.

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Should you use heat or ice for joint pain?

Dr. Ryan Bauman talks about the use of heat and ice for joint pain. Click play to watch the video or read the transcript.

 

Treatments with heat or ice may alleviate pain or treat inflammation in some types of arthritis, according to the American Academy of Physical Medicine and RehabilitationOff Site Icon.

Hip pain can be chronic, and ice packs can be effective for that type of discomfort, according to the Arthritis Foundationhttp://www.arthritis.org Off Site Icon. A cold pack can numb pain and decrease swelling and inflammation, according to the AF.

Talk to your doctor about treating joint pain with heat or ice.

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Source: Ryan Bauman, MD, Orthopedic Institute of Dayton

Content Updated: January 27, 2017

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